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UDLAP Faculty Member Participates in International Meeting on Conservation of Protected Areas

Dr. Celeste Cedillo, faculty member of the Political Science and International Relations department at UDLAP, was part of the technical committee at the Third Meeting on Protected Areas of Latin America and the Caribbean, held in Peru, where she evaluated projects, posters, and participated as a speaker, talking about governance and environmental geography applied to the Izta-Popo Park.

Latin America has important challenges regarding the conservation of protected areas, but the most relevant are the insufficiency and disparity of the budgets to maintain and manage them. While small countries like Costa Rica have several decades effectively working in public policies, others with great diversity, such as Mexico, which has around 12% of land areas and a little more in marine areas, have problems both in monetary terms and regarding personnel and equipment.

For this reason, and many more, experts from different countries met in Peru to exchange knowledge and debate about public policy, with the objective to strengthen the capabilities of the main actors in conservation in order to promote adequate handling of protected areas in Latin America. “Representatives from academia, public organizations, private companies, indigenous leaders, and NGOs participated in this meeting.  The objective was to listen to experiences on how to improve public policies, which will allow us to have more information about how to act more effectively,” explained Dr. Cedillo.

Among the experts who attended the meeting, sponsored by the International Union for Nature Conservation (UICN) and the World Commission for Protected Areas, the UDLAP faculty member stood out; she said that “they invited me to be part of the technical committee to evaluate all the proposals, presentations, posters, and everything that will be done along strategic lines.”

Also, she had an opportunity to share her experiences in conservation and protected areas through the presentation “Environmental Governance and Environmental Geography Applied to the Izta-Popo Park”, a project that paints a study case used for her doctoral thesis and which states that “if we include a geographical focus in environmental governance we can have a better impact regarding conservation and sustainable development of protected areas.”

It is important to point out that the Third Meeting on Protected Areas of Latin America and the Caribbean helped to make known proposals of different organizations, which will be sent to the Convention on Biological Diversity, where they will review the Aichi Goals in 2020. “These are goals that have been agreed upon by several countries, among them Mexico, in order to improve conservation and to draft public policies so that protected areas function adequately,” explained the UDLAP professor.